Gabon Post-Election violence: More than 1,000 arrested after disputed election

Security forces in Gabon have arrested over 1,000 people during a second day of violence following disputed presidential elections.

3600

Three people were killed in clashes in the capital, Libreville.

Protests began after the announcement that President Ali Bongo had been narrowly re-elected in Wednesday’s vote.

Opposition leader Jean Ping, who is in hiding, told the BBC that his party headquarters had been bombed.

The UN, US and former colonial power France have called for restraint and greater transparency about the results.

Culled from the BBC

Lawyers Brawl With Police, Prison Guards At SW Magistrate Court

 

At the Southwest Magistrate court, some lawyers, policemen and prison guards clashed when lawyers started taking photographs of the chained activists as they trailed into the court room and sat down.Southern Cameroon Activist Marching From the Court To The State Counsel

Noticing the kind of “heroic attention” being received by the handcuffed activist, the police men and warders quickly retaliated as they exchanged harsh words with lawyers who were photographing the activists. A group of lawyers, quickly responded to police men, informing them that an order that can prevent people from taking photographs in court can only come from the judge when the court is in session, and not from guards, whose job, they say is to bring the accused before the court.

A wardress took the issue to another level when she stood in the way of a lawyer who was about to go out of the court room. The lawyer forced his way out as he pushed the lady aside with all his might. The intention or reason behind the wardress action was not known. As he finally made his way out of court, he turned to the lady and said, “Police of La Republique…….” and ended with the suspended statement but the look on his face finished the statement as he looked furious. The lawyer explained that he got annoyed because the lady spoke rudely to him in French.

Bystanders, who took sides with the lawyers, jeered at the warders and policemen. An onlooker shouted to the policemen, “This is an Anglophone court ehh…speak English”. But the message was far from reaching its intended receivers as they fumed in French. One lady who came all the way from Akwaya averred “If I be still get age I for go law school came show this people them something”.

The issue only came to an end when the presiding judge, Justice Beatrice Ntuba Bea, came in at the beginning of the court session and ordered that no one should take pictures or videos and that anyone who is caught photographing will forfeit his device.

After the very short court session, all smart phones were once more unleashed as lawyers, Southern Cameroon activists and everyone wanted to document each stage of the demonstration at court as Southern Cameroon activists prophesied doom to La Republique and branded placards with messages like “Southern Cameroonians are not Cameroonian.” “La Republique Du Cameroon occupation of Ambazonia is an illegality and threat to peace in the West and Central African Sub region”. “Get ready to take hostage all Southern Cameroonians (Ambazonians)” amongst other hundreds of messages on placards as well as others written on T-shirts carrying the Map of Southern Cameroons.

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